Safe Passengers Embarkation

Safe Passenger Embarkation

 

The global cruise industry announced last Thursday, February 9, 2012  a new emergency drill policy requiring mandatory muster for embarking passengers prior to departure from port. The new policy follows the industry’s announcement on January 27 of a Cruise Industry Operational Safety Review in response to the Concordia incident and as part of the industry’s continuous efforts to review and improve safety measures. The Cruise Lines International Association, European Cruise Council, and the Passenger Shipping Association put forward the new policy with the support of their member cruise lines.

The new muster policy, which has been voluntarily initiated by the associations’ members and is effective immediately, exceeds existing legal requirements by calling for the mandatory muster of all embarking passengers prior to departure from port. On rare occasions when passengers arrive after the muster has been completed, passengers will be promptly provided with individual or group safety briefings that meet the requirements for musters applicable under the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS). The formal policy is designed to help ensure that any mandatory musters or briefings are conducted for the benefit of all newly embarked passengers at the earliest practical opportunity.

 

Musters are mandatory exercises conducted on cruise ships to ensure passengers are informed of safety protocols while onboard the ship, including emergency evacuation procedures. Current legal requirements for conducting a muster of passengers can be found in SOLAS and mandate that a muster occur within 24 hours of passenger embarkation.

The Cruise Industry Operational Safety Review includes a comprehensive assessment of the critical human factors and operational aspects of maritime safety. As best practices are identified, they will be shared among cruise industry association members and any appropriate recommendations will be shared with the International Maritime Organization (IMO), European Union and other governmental authorities as appropriate. The industry’s efforts also are consistent with the framework and spirit of the International Safety Management Code. Recommendations resulting from the Review will be made on an ongoing basis.

 

Passenger Muster Policy

Current legal requirements for conducting a muster of passengers are found in the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) and mandate that a muster for embarking passengers occur within 24 hours of their embarkation. Notwithstanding the legal requirement, CLIA’s member cruise lines have identified a best practice effective immediately that calls for conducting the mandatory muster for embarking passengers prior to departure from port. On occasions when guests arrive after the muster has been completed, CLIA’s policy is that they be promptly provided with individual or group safety briefings that meet the requirements for musters applicable under SOLAS. This practice exceeds existing legal requirements and has been adopted by CLIA’s membership as a formal policy to help ensure that any mandatory musters or

briefings are conducted for the benefit of all newly embarked passengers at the earliest practical opportunity.

 

 

Embarkatiom Ladders

 

accommodation ladders for merchant and passenger ships should met ISO specifications 5488-79, as well as customer’s requirements.Made of marine grade aluminum, galvanized steel or stainless steel parts.Accommodation ladders are designed to be light weight, high strengthand resistance of corrosive environment, safe and free of maintenance.Normal inclination is up to 55o to horizontal line.
Standard breadth 600mm.

 

embarkation

 

 

STANDARD EQUIPMENT :

 

  • Upper rotating 180o horizontal platform
  • Fixed curved treads with non-slip surface
  • Solid stringers
  • Yoke bracket
  • Lower platform
  • Portable stanchions on both sides
  • Shell roller
  • Dock roller
  • Lifting pad eyes

 

 

OPTIONAL:

  • Folding stanchions
  • Boat fenders
  • Post and rest for stowing
  • Davits and motor winch systems.

 

Passenger screening

All passengers and visitors entering the Passenger Terminal may be subject to screening on entering the Passenger Terminal dependent on agreed security arrangements with the Office of Transport Security and the passenger ship.

All departing passengers are subject to security screening prior to boarding the ship. The screening process seeks to detect prohibited items such as weapons, including knives. Detection of these items at screening points may increase the wait time for passengers and we request your patience.

Checked baggage is also subject to x-ray screening.

All screening at the Passenger Terminal is performed by trained personnel using x-ray machines, walk-through metal detectors and hand-held metal detectors. Explosive trace detection systems may be introduced at the passenger screening points, with random screening of passengers and carry-on goods.

 

Unattended baggage

Baggage must never be left unattended in public areas. All such baggage will be treated as suspicious. All baggage should be clearly tagged with your contact details.

     

Security-related threats

Passengers and visitors are warned that all threats and comments made about carrying of weapons or explosives — whether intended as a joke or not — will be taken seriously and may result in the person involved being removed from the Passenger Terminal or being prosecuted.