Sailboat

Boat Handling


Most boating accidents occur while departing or returning to a dock.  Ports and harbors offer more opportunities to bump into things, but you still need to know how to handle a boat in open water as well as in a congested harbor.


Rights of Way


General Rules
1.  The Rule of General Responsibility:  Regardless of the Rights of Way, don't run into other people or things.
2.  Anchored, stopped, or moored boats must be avoided by other vessels.
3.  Overtaken boats have the right of way over boats overtaking them regardless of whether the overtaken boat is power or sail.
4.  Boats with restricted maneuverability, whether due to commercial fishing, draft, length, tonnage, towing, etc., have the right of way over unrestricted vessels.
5.  Man-powered boats (e.g. canoes, rowboats, etc.) have the right of way over sailboats, powerboats, and seaplanes..
6.  Sailboats have the right of way over powerboats and seaplanes.
7.  Powerboats have the right of way over seaplanes.


Here lies the body of Jonathan Jay,
Who died defending his right of way,
He was right, dead right, as he sped along,
But he's just as dead as if he'd been wrong.

                                   --Anonymous


Sailboat vs. Sailboat

When two sailboats approach each other on opposite tacks, the sailboat on the starboard tack (i.e. wind coming across the starboard rail) has the right of way.

When two sailboats approach each other on the same tack, the leeward boat (i.e. boat farthest from the wind) has the right of way.

Powerboat vs. Powerboat

When two powerboats approach each other head on, they normally pass to the right of one another (port to port); however, they can pass starboard to starboard, but they should signal their intentions (see Signals & Communications).

When two powerboats approach each other at an angle, the boat to starboard has the right of way.  At night, the boat with the right of way would see the green running light of the other boat (indicating "go") and the other boat would see the red running light  of the boat with the right of way (indicating "stop").

An overtaken vessel--whether it be sail, power, or a combination--has right of way over the vessel overtaking it.

 

  

SOURCE: http://www.bananawind.us/Boat_Handling.htm